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West Virginia Newspapers speak Continued from page 4 Obviously, the mere fact that businesses want certain changes from the Legislature is not the only factor lawmakers must consid- er. Particularly now, with state revenue suffering from the recession, tax reform will be a tough sell. But if our state's economy ever is to make significant strides for- ward, more must be done to improve the business climate. Good jobs in manufacturing - the very kind Babe manages on a day-to-day basis - would both improve the quality of life for many West Vir- ginians and result in more revenue for state government. For that reason we encourage legislators to think again about rec- ommendations made by Babe and many other business leaders. ,Other Editors: The real result ( of welfare reform by David Hedges, Editor The Times Record Things have changed since 20 years ago, when 2,000 people lined up outside the National Guard Armory in Spencer to apply for jobs at a private prison that never came here. Now, as reported in these pages a few weeks ago in a story that made it all the way to USA Today, a manufacturing oPeration that opened here a year ago is having trouble filling its positions. It's not just an isolated case. It's a problem I have heard many other employers complain about as well. Our area has one of the highest unemployment rates in a state that also has a high jobless rate. But ask any employer. Not many people are looking for work. We have many excellent workers here. And most of them are working jobs that provide them with a level of satisfaction as well as a paycheck. The problem is, too many of those not working are also content with their situation. A theory I have shared with many is that when Congress passed welfare reform over a decade ago, it actually had the opposite effect of what was intended. By limiting the number of years a person could collect welfare, it forced people to look for alternatives. They found an aitemative in the form of disability benefits. Welfare, as it is commonly called, didn't pay very well. It was pretty hard, if not downright impossible, to scrape by on welfare benefits. One consequence of those paltry payments was that it made the option of work more appealing. Disability, on the other hand, offers average payments of $500 to $2,000 per month, according to one Web site I consulted. While that may not put you in the same tax bracket as Bill Gates, it beats the beck out of the alternatives, which come down to either starvation or welfare, with the latter not much better than the former. So when the government moved people from welfare to disabil- ity, instead of giving them an incentive we gave them a raise. The numbers of the disabled are growing, and the TV ads from lawyers promising help getting disability are growing even faster. Funny, but I don't ever recall seeing an ad from a lawyer who wanted to get anyone on welfare. I guess there just wasn't any money in that. It's unfortunate and even inexcusable that at the same time we suffer from high unemployment, there*are jobs, even decent jobs with benefits, that go unfilled. Welfare reform was passed in 1996, when we had a Democrat president and a Republican Congress. Imagine, in today's political atmosphere, where partisanship takes precedence over progress, anything being passed at all. GRANT COUNTY PRESS, Petersburg, West Virginia September 28, 2010 Page 5 A Backward Look By Harold D. Garber This week's photo is the second in a series provided by Tim Park to document the de- struction of the bridge over the South Branch which took place on Oct. 8, 1940. Next week will feature the best photo in his collection which illustrates the extent of the destruction. Needless to say, the loss of the bridge for an extended period of time certainly affected Pe- tersburg and the surrounding area. It's the prerogative of a writer to delay publication of his efforts until he has done his best to make them accurate and complete. Therefore, I am not continuing the coverage about U.S. Army training in the area, or information on the local CCC programs, until I gather a little more information. Just consider last week's column, particularly about the training of artillery and mountain troops as a teaser of what is to come. This week I'm going to treat several topics which I hope you will find interesting. The first is one which takes center stage because of a book which I'm currently reading titled "Lies My Teacher Told Me" by James W. Loewen. This book focuses on what Mr. Loewen describes as the woefully poor quality of material in 12 stan- dard editions used in high schools to teach American his- tory. Suffice it to say, he makes a strong point for doing radical improvements in our teaching materials. With this book in the back of my mind, I thought about weaving fin article about things in print related to Petersburg and Grant County which may not be factual or provable. Here's just one example, kind of a toss-up, to see if anyone knows of this even being in the realm of possibility. Maybe it's me who has been under a rock for all these years. The article: Petersburg, West Virginia. Where found: Google search locating said ar- ticle on "Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Under a section titled "No- table Natives" I found the fol- lowing: "M. Blane Michael Circuit Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit." Correct as written. Grant County can take pride in Blane, a 1961 graduate of Petersburg Celanese semi in South Branch Park High School, who has had an exemplary career in law. BUT, what about the other listing in Petersburg's "Notable Natives" (and there are only two). Preceding the name of Michael, one of our favorite sons, I find this citation: "Joan Banks--A regular on "Gang Busters" and 33 episodes of "CBS Radio Mystery Theater." Just a little stunned by this information, I visited the Joan Banks site (again on Wikipedia) and found this: "Joan Banks (October 30, 1918-January 18, 1998) was an American film, television, stage, and radio actress who often appeared in dramas with her husband, Frank Lovejoy." Under "Personal Life" the statement appears again: "Born in Petersburg, West Virginia, Banks became a regular on the 1930s radio series "Gang- busters", with Weekly episodes based on real criminal inci- dents. She married fellow "Gangbusters" actor Lovejoy. The couple had two children (a boy and a girl)." By the way, I'm just old enough to remem- ber the radio program "Gang- busters" which came on with screaming sirens and a burst on machine gun fire. I also re- member the name of the actor, Frank Lovejoy, but if Joan Banks came from Petersburg I'm informationally deprived. Now, readers, please tell me if there is any truth to this list- ing. I'm not going, to spend any great deal of time trying to get to the bottom of this, even though Wikipedia welcomes readers to edit their published material. But onceagain it at Petersburg. Photo two in points out that sources must be used with discretion. Here's ;/nother listing on the Intemet on which I need to do more research. "Grant County was created from Hardy in 1866 and named for General Ulysses Simpson Grant. After the American Civil War, there was an effort by former Con- federates to name it 'Lee County' instead after General Robert E. Lee, but the effort proved fruitless." I'll conclude this little exer- cise in "checking the facts" by engaging in a little tongue-in- cheek exercise with a story I have related previously. It can be found on wvghosts.com and it's the only ghost story that is listed for Grant County. The subheading of the site is "West Virginia's True Ghost Stories." You be the judge. "A headless ghost is some- times seen walking just south of Petersburg. The farm of George Van Meter was located in Dorcas Hollow, which is five miles from where Peters- burg is now located. Van Meter came to America from Germany. He was a carpenter who settled in Dorcas Hollow when there were only 15 other families in the entire county. He built a cabin in isolation, far out in the woods. One day he learned that sev- eral settlers had been killed in the valley by Huron Indians. Two days later, as his family was preparing to travel into town, he saw a small band of Indians running out of the for- est. He told his son to run to the cabin and take the family to town. a series of three (ourtesy of Tim Van Meter fought the Indi- ans long enough for his family to escape. His son and family made it to town to warn the other men of Indians. A group of men from town went back to rescue Van Meter. When they got to the Van Meter house, however, they found the live- stock had been butchered, the cabin burned, and Van Meter's body. Vah Meter's head was sev- ered from his body and was missing. The men searched the area for his head. They returned to town to prepare for a larger at- tack. However, the Indians did not attack the town. In town the next day was found a cook- ing pot that contained George Van Meter's head. The Indians had apparently boiled it. Peo- ple in the town would not go near the Van Meter farm, think- ing this to be either some sort of Indian curse or else' some Source of Indian exorcism. People reported seeing the headless ghost of George Van Meter walking around the farm as though he were searching for something. People believe that he is looking for his head. The two stone chimneys of the house still stand in Dorcas Hol- low. The farm was located five miles south of the town, and the chimneys are located off highway 220." I'm not going to spend any time trying to verify a fable, but I sure would like to know where Dorcas Hollow is locat- ed just in case the term appears in anything more factual. :00Health, care poll: Many think health over laul should do more ,  President Barack Obama's ealth care overhaul has divided the nation, and Republicans be- . ]ieve their call for repeal will  "help them win elections in No, vember. But the picture's not that clear cut. A new AP poll finds that T ;Americans who think the law should have done more outnum- ber those who think the govern- ment should stay out of health care by 2-to-1. "I was disappointed that it didn't provide universal cover- age," said Bronwyn Bleakley, 35, a biology professor from cent remained neutral. Those numbers are no en- dorsement for Obama's plan, but the survey also found a deep- seated desire for change that could pose a problem for Re- publicans. Only 25 percent in the poll said minimal tinkering would suffice for the health care system. Brian Braley, 49, a tech in- dustry worker from Mesa, Adz., wants Washington to keep its hands off. "I think it's a Trojan horse," Braley said of the health care law. "It's a communist, so- cialist scheme. All the other Easton, Mass. " countries that have tried this, More than 30 million 'peoll .. "they're billions in debt, and they would gain coverage in 2019 when the law is fully phased in, but another 20 million or so would remain uninsured. Bleak- ley, who was uninsured early in her career, views the overhaul as a work in progress. The poll found that about four in 10 adults think the new law did not go far enough to change the health care system, regardless of whether they sup- port the law, oppose it or remain neutral. On the other side, about one in five say they oppose the law because they think the fed- eral government should not be invOlved in health care at all. The AP poll was conducted by Stanford University with the Robert Wood Johnson Founda- tion. Overall, 30 percent favored the legislation, while 40 percent opposed it, and another 30 per- admit this doesn't work." It may well satisfy people who share Braley's outlook if Republicans succeed in tearing out what they dismiss as "Oba- macare" by the roots. But GOP leaders would still find them- selves in a quandary. Republicans "are going to have to contend with the 75 per- cent who want substantial changes in the system," said Stanford political science pro- fessor Jon Krosnick, who direct- ed the university's" participation. "Republican legislators' pas- sion to repeal the legislation" is understandable if they are pay- ing attention to members of their own party," Krosnick added. "But if they want to be responsive to all Americans, there are more Democrats and independents than there are Re- publicans." Health care proposals re- leased by House Republican leaders last week 'would create new insurance options for peo- ple with medical problems and for small businesses, but they're likely to only cover a fraction of those who would be reached by Obama's law. The poll did find some agree- ment among people who think the law should do more and those who think government should get out. Broad majorities of both the "get-outs" and "do-mores" said medical care, health insurance and prescription drugs cost too much. And most said the system should aim to increase the num- ber of people with insurance and enable Americans to get the care they need, while improving quality. The differences emerge when it comes to the means: * Only 25 percent of the "get-outs" favor requiring health insurance companies to sell coverage to people regard- less of pre-existing medical con- ditions, while 54 percent of the "do-mores" support it. The law requires insurers to cover chil- dren regardless of health prob- lems starting this year, and that protection is extended to people of all ages in 2014. * Among those who want a law that does more, 68 percent favor requiring medium to large companies to provide insurance to their workers or pay a fine; that stands at 28 percent among those who want the government out. The law does not require employers to offer coverage, but it hits companies that have 50 or more workers with a penalty if any full-time employee gets a government subsidy for health insurance. * The "get-outs" overwhelm- ingly reject the health care law's requirement that most Ameri- cans carry health insurance starting in 2014. But the "do- mores" are split, with 34 percent favoring the mandate, 33 per- cent opposing it, and 32 percent neutral. DEBTS PILING UP? BAN KRU PTCY Call Tday' 1 [ (304) 538-3799 Call Toll Free Located in the Historical Old Stone Tavern in Moorefield We are a debt relief agency, We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the bankruptcy code Tom Gergel, 45, of West Chester, Pa., said he supports the health care law because it moves toward coverage for all and does away with denial of coverage to people in poor health. But he doesn't think it's perfect. "Is this program going to make it more expensive?" asked Gergel, who sells computer soft- ware for engineers. "The jury's still out versus where we are now. We have the best health care in the world for those who can afford to pay for it, but it doesn't work for everyone." The survey was conducted Aug. 31 to Sept. 7, and involved interviews with 1,251 randomly chosen adults nationwide. It has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3.9 percentage points. Motor Co, " Harman, W.Va. 1lt ' 304-227-4131 Visit us on the Web at midwaymotorco.com D t = =V I ki={OIll Ii EOlOI H H Hti|,IM R l I I ]IH I I [tJ R Dkii Hilt 'f,: H I i ( I Trucks & 4x4s 2008 GMC 3/4 ton crew cab 2007 Chevy Silverado ext. cab 3/4 ton 2007 Chevy Colorado crew cab 2007 Chevy Trailblazer 2007 Ford Ranger extended cab F4 2007 Chevy Duramax diesel, 38K mi. 2007 Chevy Equinox LT 2007 Chevy crew cab diesel 2006 Chevy rag. cab diesel 2006 Chevy ext. cab long bed (2) 2006 Chevy extended cab 2005 Chevy crew cab 2004 Chevy Tracker (2) 2004 Chew extended cab 2004 Chew reg. cab 3/4 ton diesel 2004 Chew Avalance 2004 Chevy 3/4 ton crew Cab HD, only 15K miles 2003 Chevy Suburban LT 2001 Chevy Tracker 4x4, 74K miles, like new 2000 Jeep Cherokee Sport 2000 Chew 3/4 ton extended cab 2000 Isuzu Rodeo, 5-speed 1999 Chew S-10 extended cab Cars 2008 Chevy Malibu, 4-dr., 20K miles 2007 Chevy Cobalt, 4-dr., 26K mi. 2008 Chew Cobalt LT, 4-dr. 2006 Saturn Ion, 4-dr. 2008 Chevy Impale LT 2006 Chevy Malibu, immaculate, 50K 2008 Chevy Cobalt, 2-dr. (2) 2004 Chevy Cavalier, 2-dr. Miscellaneous Western Snow Plow $2,400 West Virginia Newspapers speak Continued from page 4 Obviously, the mere fact that businesses want certain changes from the Legislature is not the only factor lawmakers must consid- er. Particularly now, with state revenue suffering from the recession, tax reform will be a tough sell. But if our state's economy ever is to make significant strides for- ward, more must be done to improve the business climate. Good jobs in manufacturing - the very kind Babe manages on a day-to-day basis - would both improve the quality of life for many West Vir- ginians and result in more revenue for state government. For that reason we encourage legislators to think again about rec- ommendations made by Babe and many other business leaders. ,Other Editors: The real result ( of welfare reform by David Hedges, Editor The Times Record Things have changed since 20 years ago, when 2,000 people lined up outside the National Guard Armory in Spencer to apply for jobs at a private prison that never came here. Now, as reported in these pages a few weeks ago in a story that made it all the way to USA Today, a manufacturing oPeration that opened here a year ago is having trouble filling its positions. It's not just an isolated case. It's a problem I have heard many other employers complain about as well. Our area has one of the highest unemployment rates in a state that also has a high jobless rate. But ask any employer. Not many people are looking for work. We have many excellent workers here. And most of them are working jobs that provide them with a level of satisfaction as well as a paycheck. The problem is, too many of those not working are also content with their situation. A theory I have shared with many is that when Congress passed welfare reform over a decade ago, it actually had the opposite effect of what was intended. By limiting the number of years a person could collect welfare, it forced people to look for alternatives. They found an aitemative in the form of disability benefits. Welfare, as it is commonly called, didn't pay very well. It was pretty hard, if not downright impossible, to scrape by on welfare benefits. One consequence of those paltry payments was that it made the option of work more appealing. Disability, on the other hand, offers average payments of $500 to $2,000 per month, according to one Web site I consulted. While that may not put you in the same tax bracket as Bill Gates, it beats the beck out of the alternatives, which come down to either starvation or welfare, with the latter not much better than the former. So when the government moved people from welfare to disabil- ity, instead of giving them an incentive we gave them a raise. The numbers of the disabled are growing, and the TV ads from lawyers promising help getting disability are growing even faster. Funny, but I don't ever recall seeing an ad from a lawyer who wanted to get anyone on welfare. I guess there just wasn't any money in that. It's unfortunate and even inexcusable that at the same time we suffer from high unemployment, there*are jobs, even decent jobs with benefits, that go unfilled. Welfare reform was passed in 1996, when we had a Democrat president and a Republican Congress. Imagine, in today's political atmosphere, where partisanship takes precedence over progress, anything being passed at all. GRANT COUNTY PRESS, Petersburg, West Virginia September 28, 2010 Page 5 A Backward Look By Harold D. Garber This week's photo is the second in a series provided by Tim Park to document the de- struction of the bridge over the South Branch which took place on Oct. 8, 1940. Next week will feature the best photo in his collection which illustrates the extent of the destruction. Needless to say, the loss of the bridge for an extended period of time certainly affected Pe- tersburg and the surrounding area. It's the prerogative of a writer to delay publication of his efforts until he has done his best to make them accurate and complete. Therefore, I am not continuing the coverage about U.S. Army training in the area, or information on the local CCC programs, until I gather a little more information. Just consider last week's column, particularly about the training of artillery and mountain troops as a teaser of what is to come. This week I'm going to treat several topics which I hope you will find interesting. The first is one which takes center stage because of a book which I'm currently reading titled "Lies My Teacher Told Me" by James W. Loewen. This book focuses on what Mr. Loewen describes as the woefully poor quality of material in 12 stan- dard editions used in high schools to teach American his- tory. Suffice it to say, he makes a strong point for doing radical improvements in our teaching materials. With this book in the back of my mind, I thought about weaving fin article about things in print related to Petersburg and Grant County which may not be factual or provable. Here's just one example, kind of a toss-up, to see if anyone knows of this even being in the realm of possibility. Maybe it's me who has been under a rock for all these years. The article: Petersburg, West Virginia. Where found: Google search locating said ar- ticle on "Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Under a section titled "No- table Natives" I found the fol- lowing: "M. Blane Michael Circuit Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit." Correct as written. Grant County can take pride in Blane, a 1961 graduate of Petersburg Celanese semi in South Branch Park High School, who has had an exemplary career in law. BUT, what about the other listing in Petersburg's "Notable Natives" (and there are only two). Preceding the name of Michael, one of our favorite sons, I find this citation: "Joan Banks--A regular on "Gang Busters" and 33 episodes of "CBS Radio Mystery Theater." Just a little stunned by this information, I visited the Joan Banks site (again on Wikipedia) and found this: "Joan Banks (October 30, 1918-January 18, 1998) was an American film, television, stage, and radio actress who often appeared in dramas with her husband, Frank Lovejoy." Under "Personal Life" the statement appears again: "Born in Petersburg, West Virginia, Banks became a regular on the 1930s radio series "Gang- busters", with Weekly episodes based on real criminal inci- dents. She married fellow "Gangbusters" actor Lovejoy. The couple had two children (a boy and a girl)." By the way, I'm just old enough to remem- ber the radio program "Gang- busters" which came on with screaming sirens and a burst on machine gun fire. I also re- member the name of the actor, Frank Lovejoy, but if Joan Banks came from Petersburg I'm informationally deprived. Now, readers, please tell me if there is any truth to this list- ing. I'm not going, to spend any great deal of time trying to get to the bottom of this, even though Wikipedia welcomes readers to edit their published material. But onceagain it at Petersburg. Photo two in points out that sources must be used with discretion. Here's ;/nother listing on the Intemet on which I need to do more research. "Grant County was created from Hardy in 1866 and named for General Ulysses Simpson Grant. After the American Civil War, there was an effort by former Con- federates to name it 'Lee County' instead after General Robert E. Lee, but the effort proved fruitless." I'll conclude this little exer- cise in "checking the facts" by engaging in a little tongue-in- cheek exercise with a story I have related previously. It can be found on wvghosts.com and it's the only ghost story that is listed for Grant County. The subheading of the site is "West Virginia's True Ghost Stories." You be the judge. "A headless ghost is some- times seen walking just south of Petersburg. The farm of George Van Meter was located in Dorcas Hollow, which is five miles from where Peters- burg is now located. Van Meter came to America from Germany. He was a carpenter who settled in Dorcas Hollow when there were only 15 other families in the entire county. He built a cabin in isolation, far out in the woods. One day he learned that sev- eral settlers had been killed in the valley by Huron Indians. Two days later, as his family was preparing to travel into town, he saw a small band of Indians running out of the for- est. He told his son to run to the cabin and take the family to town. a series of three (ourtesy of Tim Van Meter fought the Indi- ans long enough for his family to escape. His son and family made it to town to warn the other men of Indians. A group of men from town went back to rescue Van Meter. When they got to the Van Meter house, however, they found the live- stock had been butchered, the cabin burned, and Van Meter's body. Vah Meter's head was sev- ered from his body and was missing. The men searched the area for his head. They returned to town to prepare for a larger at- tack. However, the Indians did not attack the town. In town the next day was found a cook- ing pot that contained George Van Meter's head. The Indians had apparently boiled it. Peo- ple in the town would not go near the Van Meter farm, think- ing this to be either some sort of Indian curse or else' some Source of Indian exorcism. People reported seeing the headless ghost of George Van Meter walking around the farm as though he were searching for something. People believe that he is looking for his head. The two stone chimneys of the house still stand in Dorcas Hol- low. The farm was located five miles south of the town, and the chimneys are located off highway 220." I'm not going to spend any time trying to verify a fable, but I sure would like to know where Dorcas Hollow is locat- ed just in case the term appears in anything more factual. :00Health, care poll: Many think health over laul should do more ,  President Barack Obama's ealth care overhaul has divided the nation, and Republicans be- . ]ieve their call for repeal will  "help them win elections in No, vember. But the picture's not that clear cut. A new AP poll finds that T ;Americans who think the law should have done more outnum- ber those who think the govern- ment should stay out of health care by 2-to-1. "I was disappointed that it didn't provide universal cover- age," said Bronwyn Bleakley, 35, a biology professor from cent remained neutral. Those numbers are no en- dorsement for Obama's plan, but the survey also found a deep- seated desire for change that could pose a problem for Re- publicans. Only 25 percent in the poll said minimal tinkering would suffice for the health care system. Brian Braley, 49, a tech in- dustry worker from Mesa, Adz., wants Washington to keep its hands off. "I think it's a Trojan horse," Braley said of the health care law. "It's a communist, so- cialist scheme. All the other Easton, Mass. " countries that have tried this, More than 30 million 'peoll .. "they're billions in debt, and they would gain coverage in 2019 when the law is fully phased in, but another 20 million or so would remain uninsured. Bleak- ley, who was uninsured early in her career, views the overhaul as a work in progress. The poll found that about four in 10 adults think the new law did not go far enough to change the health care system, regardless of whether they sup- port the law, oppose it or remain neutral. On the other side, about one in five say they oppose the law because they think the fed- eral government should not be invOlved in health care at all. The AP poll was conducted by Stanford University with the Robert Wood Johnson Founda- tion. Overall, 30 percent favored the legislation, while 40 percent opposed it, and another 30 per- admit this doesn't work." It may well satisfy people who share Braley's outlook if Republicans succeed in tearing out what they dismiss as "Oba- macare" by the roots. But GOP leaders would still find them- selves in a quandary. Republicans "are going to have to contend with the 75 per- cent who want substantial changes in the system," said Stanford political science pro- fessor Jon Krosnick, who direct- ed the university's" participation. "Republican legislators' pas- sion to repeal the legislation" is understandable if they are pay- ing attention to members of their own party," Krosnick added. "But if they want to be responsive to all Americans, there are more Democrats and independents than there are Re- publicans." Health care proposals re- leased by House Republican leaders last week 'would create new insurance options for peo- ple with medical problems and for small businesses, but they're likely to only cover a fraction of those who would be reached by Obama's law. The poll did find some agree- ment among people who think the law should do more and those who think government should get out. Broad majorities of both the "get-outs" and "do-mores" said medical care, health insurance and prescription drugs cost too much. And most said the system should aim to increase the num- ber of people with insurance and enable Americans to get the care they need, while improving quality. The differences emerge when it comes to the means: * Only 25 percent of the "get-outs" favor requiring health insurance companies to sell coverage to people regard- less of pre-existing medical con- ditions, while 54 percent of the "do-mores" support it. The law requires insurers to cover chil- dren regardless of health prob- lems starting this year, and that protection is extended to people of all ages in 2014. * Among those who want a law that does more, 68 percent favor requiring medium to large companies to provide insurance to their workers or pay a fine; that stands at 28 percent among those who want the government out. The law does not require employers to offer coverage, but it hits companies that have 50 or more workers with a penalty if any full-time employee gets a government subsidy for health insurance. * The "get-outs" overwhelm- ingly reject the health care law's requirement that most Ameri- cans carry health insurance starting in 2014. But the "do- mores" are split, with 34 percent favoring the mandate, 33 per- cent opposing it, and 32 percent neutral. DEBTS PILING UP? BAN KRU PTCY Call Tday' 1 [ (304) 538-3799 Call Toll Free Located in the Historical Old Stone Tavern in Moorefield We are a debt relief agency, We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the bankruptcy code Tom Gergel, 45, of West Chester, Pa., said he supports the health care law because it moves toward coverage for all and does away with denial of coverage to people in poor health. But he doesn't think it's perfect. "Is this program going to make it more expensive?" asked Gergel, who sells computer soft- ware for engineers. "The jury's still out versus where we are now. We have the best health care in the world for those who can afford to pay for it, but it doesn't work for everyone." The survey was conducted Aug. 31 to Sept. 7, and involved interviews with 1,251 randomly chosen adults nationwide. It has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3.9 percentage points. Motor Co, " Harman, W.Va. 1lt ' 304-227-4131 Visit us on the Web at midwaymotorco.com D t = =V I ki={OIll Ii EOlOI H H Hti|,IM R l I I ]IH I I [tJ R Dkii Hilt 'f,: H I i ( I Trucks & 4x4s 2008 GMC 3/4 ton crew cab 2007 Chevy Silverado ext. cab 3/4 ton 2007 Chevy Colorado crew cab 2007 Chevy Trailblazer 2007 Ford Ranger extended cab F4 2007 Chevy Duramax diesel, 38K mi. 2007 Chevy Equinox LT 2007 Chevy crew cab diesel 2006 Chevy rag. cab diesel 2006 Chevy ext. cab long bed (2) 2006 Chevy extended cab 2005 Chevy crew cab 2004 Chevy Tracker (2) 2004 Chew extended cab 2004 Chew reg. cab 3/4 ton diesel 2004 Chew Avalance 2004 Chevy 3/4 ton crew Cab HD, only 15K miles 2003 Chevy Suburban LT 2001 Chevy Tracker 4x4, 74K miles, like new 2000 Jeep Cherokee Sport 2000 Chew 3/4 ton extended cab 2000 Isuzu Rodeo, 5-speed 1999 Chew S-10 extended cab Cars 2008 Chevy Malibu, 4-dr., 20K miles 2007 Chevy Cobalt, 4-dr., 26K mi. 2008 Chew Cobalt LT, 4-dr. 2006 Saturn Ion, 4-dr. 2008 Chevy Impale LT 2006 Chevy Malibu, immaculate, 50K 2008 Chevy Cobalt, 2-dr. (2) 2004 Chevy Cavalier, 2-dr. Miscellaneous Western Snow Plow $2,400 West Virginia Newspapers speak Continued from page 4 Obviously, the mere fact that businesses want certain changes from the Legislature is not the only factor lawmakers must consid- er. Particularly now, with state revenue suffering from the recession, tax reform will be a tough sell. But if our state's economy ever is to make significant strides for- ward, more must be done to improve the business climate. Good jobs in manufacturing - the very kind Babe manages on a day-to-day basis - would both improve the quality of life for many West Vir gthians and result in more revenue for state government. For that reason we encourage legislators to think again about iec- ormnendations made by Babe and many other business leaders. Other Editors: The real resultg of welfare reform by David Hedges, Editor The Times Record Things have changed since 20 years ago, when 2,O0O people lined up outside the National Gud Armory in Spence r to apply for jobs at a private prison that never came here. Now, as reported in these pages a few weeks ago in a story that made it all the way to USA Today, a manufacturing operation that opened here a year ago is having trouble filling its positions. It's not just an isolated case. It's a problem I have heard many other employers complain about as well. Our area has one of the highest unemployment rates in a state that also has a high jobless rate. But ask My employer. Not many people are looking for work. We have many excellent workers here. And most of them are working jobs that provide them with a level of satisfaction as well s a paychk. The prohlem is, t inany of those not working are also content with their situation. A theory I have shared with many is that when Congress passed welfare reform over a decade ago. it actually had the opposite effect of what was intended. By limiting the number of years a person could collect welfare, it forced people to look for alternatives. They found an ahemative in the form of disability benefits. Welfare. as it is commonly called, didn't pay very well. It was pretty bard, if not downright impossible, to scrape by on welfare benefits. One consequence of those paltry payments was that it made the option of work more appealing. Disability, on the other hand, offers average payments of $500 to $2,000 per month, according to one Web site I consulted. While that may not put you in the same tax bracket as Bill Gates, it beats the beck out of the nltcrnagves, which come down to either starvation or welfare, with the latter not much better than the former. So when the govermaent moved people from welfare to disabil- ity. instead of giving them an incentive we gave them a raise. The nabers of the disabled e growing, d the TV ads from lawyers promising help getting disability are growing even faster. Funny, but 1 don't ever recall seeing an ad from a lawyer who wanted to get anyone on welfare. 1 guess there just wasn't any money in that. It's unfortunate and even inexcusable that at the same time we suffer from high unemployment, there are jobs. even decent jobs with benefits, that go unfilled. Welfare reform was passed in 1996. when we had a Deinocrat president and a Republican Congress. i GRANT COUNTY PRESS, Petersburg, West Virginia September 28, 2010 Page 5 A Backward Look By Harold D. Garber This week's photo is the second in a seres provided by Tim park to document the de- stmction of the bridge over the South Branch which took place on Oct. 8, 1940. Next week will feature the best photo in his collection which illustrates the extent of the destruction. Needless to say, the loss of the bridge for an extended period of time certainly affected Pe- tersburg and the surrounding area. It's the prerogative of a writer to delay publication of his efforts until he has dune his best to make them accurate mid complete. Therefore, i  not continuing the coverage about U.S. Army training in the area. or information on the local CCC programs, until I gather a little more information. Just consider last week's column, particdiarly about the training of artillery and mountain troops as a teaser of what is to come+ This week i'm going to treat several topics which I hope you will find interesting'. The first is one which takes center stage because of a book which I'm currently reading titled "Lies My Teacher Told Me" by James W. Loewen. This book focuses on what Mr. Loewen describes as the woefully poor quality of material in 12 stan- dard editions used in high schools to teach American his tory. Sufi'ice it to say. he makes a strong point for doing radical improvenlents in our teaching materials. With this book in the back of my mind, i thought about weaving an article about things in print related to Petersburg and Grant County which may not be factual or provable. Here's just one example, kind of a toss up, to see if yone knows of this even being in the realm of possibility. Maybe it's me who has been under a rock for all these yes. The article: Petersburg. West Virginia. Where found: Googhi search locating said ar ticle on "Wikipedia. the free encyclopedia." Under a section titled "No- table Natives" I found the fol- lowing: "M. Blanc Michael-- Circuit Judge. United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit." Correct as written. Grit Celanese senti in South Branch at Petersburg. Photo two in a Park High School. who has had an exemplary career in law. BUT, what about the other listing in Petersburg's "Notable Natives" (and there are only two). Preceding the name of Michael, one of our favqrite sons, l find this citation: "Joan Banks regular on "Gang Busters" and 33 episodes of "CBS Radio Mystery Theater." Just a little stunned by this information. I visited the Joan Banks site (again on Wikipedia) and found this: "Joan Banks (October 30, 1918-January 18, 1998) was an American film, television, stage, d radio actress who often appeared in dramas with her husband. Frank Lovejoy?' Under "Personal Life" the statement appears again: "Born in Petersburg, West Virginia, Banks became a regular on the 1930s radio series "Gang- busters", with weekly episodes based on real criminal inci- dents. She married fellow "Gangbusters" actor Lovejoy. The couple hod two children (a boy and a girl)." By the way, I'm just old enough to remem- ber the radio program "Gang- busters" which came on with screarmng sirens and a burst on machine gun fire. I also re- member the name of the actor, Frank Lovejoy. hut if Joan Banks can]e from Petersburg I'm informationally deprived. Now, readers, please tell me if there s any truth to this list- ing. i'm not going to spend any great deal of time trying to get to the bottom of this, even though Wikipedia welcomes points out that sources must be used with discretion. Here's another listing on the Interact on which I need to do more research. "Grant County was created from Hardy in 1866 and named for General Ulysses Simpson Grant. After the American Civil War, there was an affbrt by former Con- federates to name it 'Lee County' instead after General Robert E. Lee, but the effort proved fmifless." l'g conclude this little exer else in "checking the facts" by engaging in a little tongue-in- cheek exercise with a story 1 have related previously. It cl be found ou wvghosts.com and it's the only ghost story that is listed fur Grant County. The subheading of the site is "West Virginia's True Ghost Stories." You be the judge. "A headless ghost is solne- tiines seen walking just south of Petersburg. The farm of George Van Meter was located in Dorcas Hollow, which is five miles from where Peters- burg is now located. Van Meter came to America from Germy. He was a carpenter who settled in Dorcas Hollow when there were only 15 other families in the entire county. He built a cabin in isolation, far out in the woods. One day be learned that sev- eral settlers had been killed in the valley by Huron Indians. Two days later, as his family was preparing to travel into town, he saw a small band of Indians running out of the for- est. He told his son to run to series of three courtesy of Tim Van Meter fuught the Indi- ans long enough for his family to escape. His son and faadily made it to town to warn the other men of Indies. A group of men from town went back to rescue Van Meter. When they got to the Van Meter house. however, they found the live stock had been butchered, the cabin burned, and Van Meter's body. Vail Meter's head was sev- ered from his body and was missing. The men searched the area for his head. They returned to town to prepare for a larger at- tack. However, the Indies did not attack the town. In town the next day was found a cook thg pot that contained George Van Meter's head. The Indians had apparently boiled it. Peo- ple in the town would not go near the Van Meter farm. think- ing this to be either some sort of Indian curse or else some source of Indian exorcism. People reported seeing the headless ghost of George Van Meter walking around the farm as though he were seching for something. People believe that he is looking for his bead. The two stone chimneys of the house still stand in Dorcas Hol- low. The farm was lated five miles south of the town. and the chimneys are located off highway 220." I'm not going to spend any time trying to verify a fable. but l sure would like to know where Dorcas Hollow is Iocat ed just in case the term appes in anything more factual. Imagine, in today's political atmosphere, where partisanship CountycantakepfideinBlane, readers toed]] theft published the cabin and take tbe fanrily to takes precedence over progress, anything being passed at all. a 1961 graduate of Petersbnrg material. But once again it town. i!Health care poll: Many think health overhaul should do more , ? president Barack Obama's cent remained neutral. lealth care overhaul has divided Those numbers are no en- be nation, and Republicans be- dorsement for Obama's plan, but ]ieve their call for repeal will the survey also found a deep- 5elp them w0n elections in No; seated desire for change that vember. But the picture's not could pose a problem for Re- that clear cut. publicans. Only 25 percent in A new AP poll finds that the poll said minimal tinkering Americans wbo think the law would suffice for the health care should have done more oumum- system. her those who thing the govern- Brian Brahiy, 49, a tech in- ment should stay out of health dustry worker from Mesa, Adz,. care by2-to-l, wants Washington Io keep its "I was disappointed that it hands Off. "I thing it's a Trojan didn't provide universal cover- horse." Braley said of the health age." said Bronwyn Bleakley. care law. "It's a communist, so- 35, a biology professor from nlaiixt scheme. All the other Easton. Mass. countries that have tried this, More than 30 million peo!fu, they're billions in debt, and they would gain coverage in 2019 admit this doesn't work." when the law is fully phased in, It may well satisf), people but another 20 million or so who share Braley's outlook if would remain uninsured. Bleak- Republicans succeed in tearing hiy, who was uninsured early in her career, views the overhaul as a work in progress. The poll found that about four in 10 adults think the new law did not go far enough to change the health care system, regardless of whether they sup- port the law. oppose it or maln neutral. On the other side, about one in five say they oppose the law because they think the fed- era] government should not be involved in beaith care at all. The AP poll was conducted out what they dismiss as "Oba- macare" by the roots. But CrOP leaders would still find them- selves in a quandary. Republicms "e going to have to contend with the 75 per- cent who want substantial changes in the system," said Stford political science pro- fessor Jon Krosnick, who direct- ed the university's participation. "Republican higisla[ols' pas- sion to repeal the legislation is understandabhi if they are pay- ing attention to members of by Stanford University with the their own party," Krosnick Robert Wood Johnson Founda- added. "But if they want at be tion, Overall, 30 percent favored responsive to all Americans, the legislation, while 40 percent there are more Democrats and opposed it, d another 30 per- independents than there are Re- publicans." Health care proposals re- leased by House Republican leaders last week wonld create new insurance options for peo- ple with medical problems and for small businesses, but they're likely to only cover a fraction of those who would be reached by Obama's law. The poll did find some agree- ment among people who think the law should do more and those wbo think government should get out. Broad majorities of both the "get-outs" and "do-mores" said medical care, health insurance and prescription drugs cost too much. And most said the system should aim to increase the num- ber of people with insurance and enable Americans to get the care they need, while improving quality. The differences emerge when it comes o the means: * Only 25 percent of the "get-outs" favor requiring health insurance companies to sell coverage to people regard- less of pro-existing medical con- ditions, while 54 percent of the "do-mores" support it. The law requires insurers to cover chil- dren regardless of health prob- lems starting this year. and that protection is extended to people of all ages in 2014. * Among those who want a law that does more, 68 percent favor requiring medium to large companies to provide insurance to their workers or pay a fine; that stands at 28 percent among those who want the government out. The law does not require employers to offer coverage, but it hits companies that have 50 or more workers with a penalty if y full time employee gets a government subsidy for health insurance. * The "get-outs" overwhelm- ingly reject the health care law's requirement that most Ameri- cans carry health insurance starting in 2014. But the "do- mores" are split, with 34 percent favoring the mandate, 33 per- cent opposing it, and 32 percent neutral. DEBTS PILING UP? [ BANKRUPTCY Call Today! Ca]] Toll Free Located in lhe Hislo0cc0 Old 8tone TGvern in Moorefield We  a debt =ef agerary. We help people file for bnkpty r e]ie[ der the bankruptcy code ( Tom Gergel, 45, of West now. We have the best health Chester, Pa., said he supports care in the world for those who the health care law because it can afford to pay for it, but it moves toward coverage for all doesn't work for everyone." and ds away with denial of The survey was conducted coverage to people in poor Aug. 81 to Sept. 7, and involved health. But he doesn't think it's interviews with 1,251 randomly perfect, chosen adults nationwide. It has "Is this program going to a margin of smnpting error of make it more expensive?" asked plus or minus 3.9 percentage Gergel, who sells computer soft- points. ware for engineer. "The jury's still out versus where we are Motor Co, "' Harman, W.Va. 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